Two California Urban School Districts Notorious for Project Labor Agreements Team Up With Construction Unions to Seek Voter Approval for Construction Bond Measures

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Two California urban school districts notorious for requiring their construction contractors to sign Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) will be asking voters to approve huge bond measures at the November 6, 2012 election. The elected board members of the San Diego Unified School District and the Sacramento City Unified School District expect that voters turning out to support President Barack Obama’s re-election will also vote for new taxes on property owners to fund school construction. Campaign support for these bond measures will come from construction unions, who will control the work because the school boards are requiring construction companies to sign Project Labor Agreements with unions as a condition of work.

Voters have overwhelmingly approved bond measures in these two districts in the past, but government-mandated Project Labor Agreements were not an issue in those elections. The big question now: will advocates of fiscal responsibility develop an organized and effective campaign to offset the campaign resources of the unions and the subtle support of the school districts?

SAN DIEGO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Last night (July 24, 2012), the Board of Education of the San Diego Unified School District approved a resolution to place a $2.8 billion bond measure on the November 6, 2012 ballot. This plot to get more taxpayer funding for construction has been in the works since the board’s November 1, 2011 meeting, at which the board directed staff to study the feasibility of a new capital facilities bond measure. The board received the results of the feasibility study on February 14, 2012, and of course the bond measure was highly feasible.

This is the third time in 15 years that the San Diego Unified School District has asked voters to approve billion-dollar bond measures. On November 3, 1998, 78% of voters approved the $1.51 billion Proposition MM, under which construction was awarded under fair and open bid competition, despite union lobbying for the school district to mandate that construction contractors sign a Project Labor Agreement.

Not knowing at the time that construction unions would be given control of the work, 69% of voters approved the $2.1 billion Proposition S on November 4, 2008. A Project Labor Agreement was sprung by the school board in January 2009 after union special interests won a seat in the same election and attained 3-2 majority control. The final version of the Project Labor Agreement was approved in July 2009 on a 3-2 vote, and the two board members who voted against it are no longer on the board.

In contrast to 2008, San Diego voters in the November 2012 election will be fully aware that the school board has given unions control of most of the work funded by the proposed $2.8 billion bond measure. To lock in the Project Labor Agreement for additional work funded by future bond measures, the school board voted 5-0 at the July 24, 2012 meeting for a resolution that expands the scope of the Project Labor Agreement for all projects that exceed $1 million and are paid for in whole or in part with future local bond funds.

Usually school boards are coy about their plans to mandate a Project Labor Agreement until after voters approve a bond measure. In this case, voters will be considering the wisdom of government-mandated Project Labor Agreements as well as the wisdom of taxing the citizens and businesses of San Diego an additional $2.8 billion (plus billions more in interest) for school construction.

SACRAMENTO CITY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

On July 19, the Board of Trustees of the Sacramento City Unified School District approved a resolution to place a $346 million bond measure on the November 6, 2012 ballot. This plot to get more taxpayer funding for construction has been in the works since the board’s January 19, 2012 meeting, at which the board authorized the development of a Sustainable Facilities Master Plan. A feasibility study for this bond measure, including polling of voters, is ongoing, but you can bet that the bond measure will be found to be highly feasible.

This is the third time in 15 years that the Sacramento City Unified School District has asked voters to approve multi-million-dollar bond measures. On October 19, 1999, 79% voters approved the $195 million Measure E in a special election. On November 5, 2002, 67% of voters approved the $225 million Measure I.

The board of the Sacramento City Unified School District voted 5-1 on September 1, 2005 to require all contractors to sign a Project Labor Agreement with construction unions in order to work on projects worth $1 million or more funded by the remaining $170 million authorized by Measure E (1999) and Measure I (2002). On September 4, 2009, the board voted 5-0 to extend the district’s Project Labor Agreement on all Sacramento City Unified School District projects worth $1 million or more for another four years. International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local No. 340 union official and board member Patrick Kennedy did not vote, in order to avoid a conflict-of-interest. See the amended and extended Project Labor Agreement here.

The school board for the Sacramento City Unified School District has considered Project Labor Agreements three times since 2000.  The change in voting patterns symbolizes the change in the political climate of California over the past 15 years.

  • 2000          Board voted 4-3 to reject a PLA.
  • 2005          Board voted 5-1 to approve a PLA. (Actual vote count was 5-2.)
  • 2009          Board voted 5-0 to renew a PLA. (Actual vote count was 7-0.)

One comment

  1. amanaplanacanalpanama says:

    Not to be a negative Nelly, but I think the answer to your question: will advocates of fiscal responsibility develop an organized and effective campaign to offset the campaign resources of the unions and the subtle support of the school districts?

    ..is NO.