How to Get Your Money if You Were a Construction Trades Worker Building the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel

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Did you work on the construction of the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel? A June 17, 2013 press release issued by the California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) – Labor Commissioner Collects Over $8 Million in Wages for Public Works Job at Hilton Hotel in San Diego – states that you may be owed money, but it did not explain how workers can collect their money.

As a result of my June 17, 2013 blog post about the State of California determining that the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel was a public works project (Contractor Has to Shell Out $8 Million After Unions Win Argument That Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel Was a “Public Works” Project), I’m receiving communications from some of the 2000+ workers on that project who want to know how to get their payments. The California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (Labor Commissioner’s office) gave me the following information about what to do if you are one of those 2000+ workers:

Send your contact information to this California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement district office address (presumably via a letter or postcard) explaining that you were a trades worker on the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel:

California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement
7575 Metropolitan Drive, Room 210
San Diego, CA  92108

According to a representative in the DIR Legal Division, payments to former workers (in the form of checks) are supposed to be available 60-90 days after the June 17, 2013 official announcement. A third-party administrator is handling the processing of the payments.

The phone number for this San Diego district office is (619) 220-5451 and the web site for all California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement district offices is http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/districtOffices.htm.

As one attorney remarked to me, it’s unclear how the Department of Industrial Relations is going to determine exactly what is owed, because contractors would not necessarily have maintained certified payroll records for a project that was originally assumed to be a private construction job and not a public works job. For example, how will job classifications be determined for work done several years ago? Are any of the alleged 172 subcontractors on that project now out of business after several years of economic distress in the construction industry? Have employment records been saved? Will all workers be regarded as journeymen? How does the agency know there were 2,051 workers in total?

2 comments

  1. William Jones says:

    I sent my information in I have not heard one word about this since,that was about 60 days ago I believe this following Monday marks 90 days since June 17th has anyone heard anything new on these “checks” ? I would be very thankful if someone could bring me up to date on this , thank you

  2. william jones says:

    I sent the third part the paper work they sent me,they signed for it October 3rd the paper work I have said I would receive a check 7-10 days after they receive it,its now October 23rd does anyone know who collects the interest on the over 8 million dollars I’m sure its not me…this is not funny anymore !