Archive for Public Debt – State of California

News Coverage: California Voters Must Be Wary of More Borrowing Via Bond Sales for School and Community College Construction

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In July 2015, the California Policy Center released a 361-page report For the Kids: California Voters Must Become Wary of Borrowing Billions More from Wealthy Investors for Educational Construction. (Links to individual sections are below.)

For the Kids - California Voters Must Become Wary of Borrowing Billions More from Wealthy Investors for Educational ConstructionAs of August 26, 2015, the report has received the following news media coverage:

Six California School Districts Will Ask Voters on November 3 to Borrow $1.2 Billion From Bond Investors – commentary by Kevin Dayton – Flash Report – August 17, 2015

Unions Seek Control of Recent California School Bond Measures – commentary by Kevin Dayton – Union Watch – August 11, 2015

School Bonds May Equal Taxpayer BondageVictorville Daily Press – August 8, 2015

California Schools Stick Taxpayers with $149 Billion in Bond Debt – Breitbart News – August 5, 2015

California is in Huge Debt Hole Because of School Bonds – KFBK News Radio 1530 AM/93.1 FM in Sacramento – August 4, 2015

“For the Kids” Borrowing Will Saddle Kids with Debt – opinion piece by Gloria Romero in Orange County Register – August 4, 2015

Tough Education Reform, not More Borrowing and Spending, is What Students Need – commentary by Ed Ring – Union Watch – August 4, 2015

Specter of School Bonds Is Haunting Californians – opinion piece by Ed Ring in Sacramento Bee – August 2, 2015

Statewide Report Criticizes Passage of School Bonds – lead story in California League of Bond Oversight Committees Review – July 29, 2015

Doing the Math, Bond Debt for California Schools May Not Pencil OutModesto Bee – July 28, 2015

First look: Poll finds support for testing — Pell grants for prisoners — Washington state chief: Put more dollars into education – Politico (Morning Education) – July 28, 2015

School Bond Proposal Stirs California DebateThe Bond Buyer – July 27, 2015

Report: Voters Better Start Learning How Construction Bonds WorkLA School Report – July 27, 2015

Deceptive Ballot Language for Solano College Bond Measure Not Unusual – opinion piece by Kevin Dayton in Vacaville Reporter – July 25, 2015

Statewide Report Criticizes Passage of School BondsFresno Bee – July 24, 2015 (reprinted as Report Criticizes Passage of School Bonds in California in Education Week – July 27, 2015)

Here are links to each section of the report:

###

Revised: A Timeline of Activity Concerning What Will Be $9.95 Billion Borrowed through Proposition 1A Bond Sales for California High-Speed Rail

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

UPDATE – April 13, 2014: I’ve added information at the bottom of the chart below based on two additional Official Statements issued by the State of California since I wrote the original article.

“Long-Term Bonds Outstanding” for California High-Speed Rail Prop 1A remained at $703,530,000 as of September 1, 2013 but dropped (for the first time) to $623,705,000 as of February 1, 2014.

I presume some of the money borrowed by the State of California through these bond issues is being used to fund the “connectivity projects” authorized for $950 million in a part of Proposition 1A (now California Streets and Highways Code Section 2704.095):

2704.095. (a) (1) Net proceeds received from the sale of nine hundred fifty
million dollars ($950,000,000) principal amount of bonds authorized by this
chapter shall be allocated to eligible recipients for capital improvements to
intercity and commuter rail lines and urban rail systems that provide direct
connectivity to the high-speed train system and its facilities, or that are part of
the construction of the high-speed train system as that system is described in
subdivision (b) of Section 2704.04, or that provide capacity enhancements and
safety improvements. Funds under this section shall be available upon
appropriation by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act for the eligible
purposes described in subdivision (d).

SB 1029 (enacted in July 2012) appropriated $819,333,000 for state, regional, and local agencies other than the California High-Speed Rail Authority to help fund connectivity projects. (Note: this does not include the $1,100,000,000 appropriated for “bookend” projects, which includes $600,000 to electrify and update the Caltrain rail system and $500,000 to upgrade unspecified rail systems under a Southern California Memorandum of Understanding with the California High-Speed Rail Authority.)

Some questions to which I don’t know the answers:

  1. Why did the amount for “Long-Term Bonds Outstanding” go down between September 1, 2013 and February 1, 2014?
  2. How was the California State Treasurer able to issue bonds under Proposition 1A before the state legislature appropriated money in July 2012?
  3. Have any of the proceeds from Prop 1A bonds been spent on “bookend projects?” What happens if some of the $1.1 billion appropriated for “bookend” projects is spent but doesn’t become part of the California High-Speed Train System in the end? Will that money be transformed into connectivity funding?

Are the $1,274,000,000 in appropriations listed below for “Connectivity?” Or are they for “Bookends?” (Only $950,000,000 Can Be Spent Outside of High-Speed Train Service)

$706,000,000 Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board (Caltrain) – Electrification Installation of an electric rail system that phases out diesel trains and blends the Caltrain system with the high-speed rail line. With matching funds, total spending is $1.456 billion.
$42,000,000 Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board (Caltrain) – Advanced Signaling System: Communications Based Overlay Signal System (CBOSS) Positive Train Control (PTC) Project Design, installation, testing, training and warranty for an intelligent network of signals, sensors, train tracking technology, computers, etc. on the Caltrain Corridor to meet mandated federal guidelines. With funds from BART and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, total spending is $231 million. This work began in September 2013.
$26,000,000 Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (Caltrain) – Advanced Signaling System: Communications Based Overlay Signal System (CBOSS) Positive Train Control (PTC) Project Design, installation, testing, training and warranty for an intelligent network of signals, sensors, train tracking technology, computers, etc. on the Caltrain Corridor to meet mandated federal guidelines.
$500,000,000 Southern California Memorandum of Understanding Regional rail projects that improve local networks and facilitate high-speed rail travel to Southern California. Projects will be selected by local transit agencies, in conjunction with the High-Speed Rail Authority, and state funding will be matched by additional investments to make the total investment in these projects $1 billion.

Original Post – May 13, 2013: It seems that 99.999% of Californians are unaware of how, when, and how much the State of California has borrowed for California High-Speed Rail by selling bonds to investors. My requests at two board meetings of the California High-Speed Rail Authority to be open and transparent about the details of the bond sales – even to the point of having an agenda item at each meeting dedicated to the topic – have been ignored, of course. Their strategy is to keep the public and the news media uninformed, probably because the details are not comforting.

It appears the California State Treasurer has sold about $700 million worth of Proposition 1A bonds to date. While early bond sales for California High-Speed Rail appear to be segregated from bond sales for other purposes, recent sales suggest that California State Treasurer Bill Lockyer was correct when he said the high-speed rail bonds were “mixed together” with bonds for other purposes. That was his response to my questions at the California League of Bond Oversight Committees annual conference on May 10, 2013. Someone in the bond industry told me this mixing was “unusual,” but perhaps we’re misunderstanding what’s going on.

People have asked me how the state was able to sell California High-Speed Rail bonds before the legislature and governor first authorized the sale of bonds in July 2012. I do not know.

I have not been able to figure out how much in interest has been paid so far, where the money was obtained to pay the interest so far (perhaps appropriations for the California High-Speed Rail Authority from the General Fund?), and the current debt service on the bonds.

Basically, we’re all ignorant peons left in the dark by the forces that control everything.

Here’s a preliminary timeline of activity concerning bond sales for California High-Speed Rail, with links to source documents. It’s nothing great, but it’s a step in the right direction for people to fill in the blanks and try to figure out what’s going on. If you see a mistake or know something to be added to it, please let me know.

Amount Borrowed Through Bond Sales (Principal, Does Not Include Interest) Date and Action Link to Source Documents
$0 August 26, 2008 – Governor Schwarzenegger signs into law Assembly Bill 3034, which puts the “Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century” (Proposition 1A) on the November 4, 2008 California ballot. According to the bill, the state would borrow $9.95 billion through bond sales in order to “encourage the federal government and the private sector to make a significant contribution toward the construction of the high-speed train system.” Borrowed money would be available for the California High-Speed Rail Authority to spend under specified conditions and criteria for planning, land acquisition, design, engineering, and construction. The California High-Speed Rail Authority would be required to pursue and obtain other private and public funds, including, but not limited to, federal funds, funds from revenue bonds, and local funds. The California State Treasurer would sell the bonds as authorized by an appointed California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee under terms and conditions specified in committee resolutions. Bonds could have a maturity period as long as 40 years. The committee would consider program funding needs, revenue projections, financial market conditions, and other necessary factors in determining the term for the bonds to be issued. Each year, the state would collect taxes and fees for the General Fund that would pay principal and interest to bond investors. In addition, the board of the California High-Speed Rail Authority could request a loan from the Pooled Money Investment Board to make a loan against the amount of authorized but unsold bonds. Assembly Bill 3034 – Proposition 1A
$0 November 4, 2008 – 52.7% of California voters (including 78.4% of San Francisco voters) approve Proposition 1A. November 2008 Election Results
$0 January 16, 2009 – the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee approves Resolution I under the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century, authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the principal amount not to exceed $32,010,000. The committee also approved Resolution II under the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century, authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Refunding Bonds in the aggregate principal amount outstanding not to exceed $32,010,000. January 16, 2009 Minutes – Resolution I – Resolution II
$0 February 1, 2009 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding State Public Works 2009
$0 April 6, 2009 – “The High Speed Rail Authority had been financed via a commercial paper issue.” April 6, 2009 Minutes
>$0< April 15, 2009 – the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee approves Resolution III under the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century, (i) amending the provisions of Resolution I authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the principal amount not to exceed $32,010,000, and (ii) authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the principal amount not to exceed (a) the principal amount unissued under Resolution I of $32,010,000 and (b) an additional principal amount not to exceed $448,790,000, for a total principal amount not to exceed $480,800,000. The Committee also approves Resolution IV under the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century, authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Refunding Bonds in the aggregate principal amount outstanding not to exceed $480,800,000. April 15, 2009 Minutes – Resolution III – Resolution IV
$90,045,000 April 22, 2009 – the California State Treasurer sells $90,045,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century Series A Build America Bonds, Federally Taxable.CDIAC Number: 2009-0940 Standard & Poor’s Rating: A Moody’s Rating: A2 Fitch Rating: A –Term: 30 years Rate: VAR%

At the August 6, 2009 board meeting, the Authority executive director noted that this money was a piece of a $4-5 billion state bond sale and would be used by the Authority in FY 2009-10.

2009 Annual Report
$90,045,000 July 1, 2009 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding 2009 Treasurer Publication
$90,045,000 August 1, 2009 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$90,045,000 October 1, 2009 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$258,395,000 October 8, 2009 – the California State Treasurer sells $168,350,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century Series B Build America Bonds, Federally Taxable. CDIAC Number: 2009-1481 Standard & Poor’s Rating: A Moody’s Rating: Baa1 Fitch Rating: BBB Term: 30 years Rate: 6.933% 2009 Annual Report
$258,395,000 January 20, 2010 – the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee amends Resolution III with resolution V and Resolution IV with Resolution VI. These two resolutions reflect changes to the General Obligation Bond Law that became effective January 1, 2010, and other technical amendments. January 20, 2010 Minutes – Resolution V – Resolution VI
$258,395,000 February 1, 2010 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$258,395,000 June 30, 2010 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$258,395,000 October 1, 2010 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding >Official Statement
$309,060,000 November 19, 2010 – the California State Treasurer sells $50,665,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century Series C, Federally Taxable.CDIAC Number: 2010-1714Standard & Poor’s Rating: A-Moody’s Rating: A1Fitch Rating: A –Term: 30 yearsRate: 7.438% 2010 Annual Report
$410,050,000 November 22, 2010 – the California State Treasurer sells $100,990,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century Series D. CDIAC Number: 2009-1695Standard & Poor’s Rating: A-Moody’s Rating: A1Fitch Rating: A-Term: 30 yearsRate: 5.133% Official Statement – see earlier Official Statement
$410,050,000 June 30, 2011 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding 2011 Annual Report
$410,050,000 September 21, 2011 – High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee approves Resolution VII, which amends Resolution III authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the principal amount not to exceed $480,800,000, and (ii) authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the principal amount not to exceed (a) the principal amount unissued under Resolution III of $70,750,000 and (b) an additional principal amount not to exceed $59,250,000, for a total principal amount not to exceed $130,000,000. The Committee also approves Resolution VIII under the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century, authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Refunding Bonds in the aggregate principal amount outstanding not to exceed $540,050,000. September 21, 2011 Minutes – Resolution VII – Resolution VIII
$410,050,000 August 1, 2011 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$499,285,000 October 25, 2011 – the California State Treasurer to sell $91,225,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century bonds as Series E. Official Statement
$499,285,000 November 1, 2011 – Treasurer Lockyer Comments on Revised High-Speed Rail Business Plan. November 1, 2011 Press Release
$499,285,000 January 1, 2012 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$499,285,000 February 1, 2012 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$499,285,000 June 30, 2012 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding 2012 Annual Report
$499,285,000 July 18, 2013 – As required under Proposition 1A, Governor Jerry Brown signs into law Senate Bill 1029, which appropriates $2,609,076,000 in Proposition 1A funds plus $3,240,676,000 in federal funds for the first operating segment of the High-Speed Rail between Madera and Bakersfield, $1,100,000,000 for “Bookend” funding, $106,000,000 to CalTrans for capital improvement projects to intercity and commuter rail lines and urban rail systems that provide direct connectivity, and an appropriation of $713,333,000 for “Connectivity” funding. Senate Bill 1029 (2012)
$499,285,000 February 1, 2013 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$499,285,000 March 18, 2013 – California High-Speed Rail Authority approves Resolutions #13-03 and #13-04 requesting the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee to authorize the sale of $8,599,715,000 in bonds. Resolution #13-03 – Resolution #13-04
$499,285,000 March 18, 2013 – the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee approves Resolution IX and Resolution X to authorize sale of $8,599,715,000 in bonds. Resolution X
$499,285,000 March 29, 2013 – the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee previously adopted Resolution III authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the Principal Amount Not to Exceed $480,800,000 (“Resolution III”) and Resolution VII authorizing the issuance of State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds or Commercial Paper Notes in the Principal Amount Not to Exceed $130,000,000 (“Resolution VII”). As of March 29, 2013, the State had issued $100,990,000 State of California High-Speed Passenger Train Bonds, Series D, currently outstanding in the principal amount of $99,000,000 (the “Resolution III Bonds”) pursuant to Resolution III. $38,775,000 remains in principal amount of bonds or commercial paper notes under Resolution VII, and the Committee now desires to authorize the issuance of bonds to refund any bonds issued from time to time under Resolution VII (the “Resolution VII Bonds”). Resolution XI
$538,060,000 April 11, 2013 – the California State Treasurer to sell $38,775,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century bonds as Series F. Official Statement
$703,530,000 April 11, 2013 – the California State Treasurer to sell $165,470,000 of Safe Reliable High Speed Passenger Train 21st Century bonds as Series G. Official Statement
$703,530,000 September 1, 2013 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement
$623,705,000 February 1, 2014 – Long Term Bonds Outstanding Official Statement

After Seven Years, California High-Speed Rail Still Lacks Comprehensive and Credible Plan for Financing System

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The California State Senate Transportation and Housing Committee held an informational hearing on March 27, 2014 entitled “Toward a World-Class Passenger Rail System in California:  Evaluating High-Speed Rail’s Potential for Success.” (See agendabackground information, a report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, and the video of the hearing.)

Of greatest concern to committee chairman Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) was the lack of a comprehensive and credible plan for financing the system in the California High-Speed Rail Authority Draft 2014 Business Plan.

Some things never change!

I have saved this old email from Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s office forwarding an opinion piece published in the May 4, 2007 Fresno Bee. In it, he claims to support High-Speed Rail but doesn’t want to provide significant money for it in the 2007-08 state budget because “there is still no comprehensive and credible plan for financing the system.” He compares the speculative nature of funding sources for High-Speed Rail with the well-outlined plan for complete funding of projects authorized in a proposed water bond – a ballot measure that has never come before California voters.

See the phrases highlighted in bold font below.


From: governorsofficeofexternalaffairs@gov.ca.gov

Date: Fri, 4 May 2007 08:57:45

Subject: Must Build High-Speed Rail

 

Fresno Bee: State Must Build High-Speed Rail

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger

As the recent Bay Area freeway collapse illustrated — and as a recent Bee editorial correctly pointed out — Californians need and deserve a diverse array of transportation options. I absolutely believe high-speed rail should be one of those alternatives.

A network of high-speed rail lines connecting cities throughout California would be a tremendous benefit to our state.

Not only would its construction bring economic development and the creation of hundreds of thousands of new jobs, but once completed, we would also see improvements to our air quality, reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, congestion relief on our highways and greater mobility for people living in the Valley and other areas of our state currently underserved by other forms of transportation.

Yet it’s been more than 10 years, and the state has already spent more than $40 million in initial planning for the rail line. But there is still no comprehensive and credible plan for financing the system so we can get construction under way.

The High-Speed Rail Authority, the commission in charge of developing a plan for high speed rail in California, estimates the cost of building the system to be more than $40 billion.

Yet so far, the only financing party identified with specificity is the state, which the Authority proposes float a $9.95 billion bond. The remaining 75% of the project cost, or more than $30 billion, has yet to be identified with any specificity or confidence.

Before asking taxpayers to approve spending nearly $10 billion plus interest, it is reasonable to expect the authority and its advisers to identify with confidence where we will find the remaining $30 billion.

A perfect example of what I’m talking about is my $5.9 billion water infrastructure package. By using a public-private partnership approach, we’ve identified a plan that lays out exactly how we are going to pay for every piece of the proposal, from the reservoirs to the groundwater storage to fixing the Delta to our conservation efforts.

For the reservoir portion, the estimated building cost is $4 billion. We’ve proposed $2 billion in general obligation bonds for the public portion and $2 billion in lease revenue bonds to be paid for by the water users themselves, i.e. water agencies, irrigation districts, cities, etc. And to ensure that this funding materializes, we are requiring that contracts be in place to pay for the lease revenue bonds before public dollars are spent on the projects.

Identifying the exact funding sources for large transportation projects is more problematic, which is why we need the authority to come up with a well-thought out financing proposal before moving forward.

I want to commend the authority for its great progress so far in completing the necessary environmental studies and identifying future rights-of-way that we would need to acquire.

Yet even the authority’s executive director, Mehdi Morshed, says the longer the state waits to build a high-speed rail network, the more expensive it will get. I could not agree more.

That’s why I have directed my recent appointees to work with the authority and its financial advisers to develop a comprehensive plan for financing the project in its entirety, so we can make high-speed rail a reality in California once and for all.

Last year, my administration increased funds for the authority to continue its work, and this year, my budget proposes additional funding.

I am willing to explore multiple approaches in order to fund the balance and execute this project — whether through federal grants, local participation, vendor support, co-development opportunities, public-private partnerships or any other realistic financing plans in which the authority expresses confidence.

I look forward to working with the authority and reviewing its proposal as soon as possible.

But let me be clear: I strongly support high-speed rail for California, and especially for the San Joaquin Valley. Increasing the Valley’s transportation options, especially after voters passed Proposition 1B to repair Highway 99, would better serve the region’s growing population and enhance the Valley’s critical importance to our state’s economy.

The promise of high-speed rail is incredible. Looking forward to the kind of California we want to build 20 and 30 years from now, a network of ultra-fast rail lines whisking people from one end of the state to the other is a viable and important transportation alternative and would be a great benefit to us all.

With a responsible plan in place, we can feel secure in delivering high-speed rail and bringing greater opportunity — and a brighter future — to all Californians.

###

Background

Governor Schwarzenegger had initially included only $1.2 million in his original proposed 2007-08 state budget to keep the California High-Speed Rail Authority operating. (The California High-Speed Rail Authority reportedly had requested $103 million.) The Los Angeles Times reported in the April 29, 2007 article State Puts Brakes on Bullet Train Plan that “Schwarzenegger’s budget would reduce the authority to an office with no more than six full-time employees — without the 75 consulting firms with 300 employees it has now. Outside contracts would need to be canceled, route planning put on hold and environmental and engineering work frozen.” He also proposed again postponing the 2008 ballot measure to authorize bond sales.

Environmental and transit groups criticized this. They claimed he was betraying a commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 that he signed into law.

In the end, the budget signed by the Governor included $1,159,000 for support of the High-Speed Rail Authority.

Another Tax Reform Group Backed by Unions: Don’t Be Fooled

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Perhaps the description “venerable” would be appropriate for a group called the California Tax Reform Association, which has been involved for almost 40 years in various campaigns to increase income taxes on “the rich” and corporate entities. (See Coalition Seeks to Eliminate Tax Breaks for Rich, CorporationsLos Angeles Times – November 21, 1991.) In recent years, the California Tax Reform Association made a public appearance when its executive director signed a support argument for Proposition 24, an unsuccessful ballot measure in November 2010 to “close corporate loopholes.”

On January 29, 2014, the Los Angeles Times ran a column by George Skelton (Lack of Leadership a Big Obstacle in Updating Prop 13) about proposed changes to Proposition 13 that would result in higher tax assessments against commercial property owners. It cited the executive director of the California Tax Reform Association, but did not indicate the agenda or backers of this organization for readers.

George Skelton began writing for the Los Angeles Times in 1974 and the California Tax Reform Association was founded in 1976, so perhaps it was assumed that everyone knew about this group and its historical influence. One might feel a little melancholy to see how the California Tax Reform Association has not kept up with changing times: it hasn’t posted on its web site since May 2012 and it does not appear to use social media.

My article Taxpayer Group Pushing to Gut California’s Prop. 13 is Union Front Group, posted on February 4, 2013 in www.UnionWatch.org, reveals the funding sources and leadership of this organization. It’s a front for public employee unions.

Five Winning Issues for a Republican Candidate for California State Treasurer – My Article in www.FlashReport.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

San Francisco Chronicle columnist Debra Saunders began her January 15, 2014 column “Who Wants to Lose to Gov. Jerry Brown?” with the following observation:

How near death is the California Republican Party? It’s this bad. Democrats hold every statewide office. Term limits have opened up a few offices; still, no serious Republican plans to run for attorney general, lieutenant governor, treasurer or controller this year. If the lead Democrat for any of those offices dies in September, there will be no Republican in the race to win in November.

Saunders identified two Republicans “fighting over the honor of losing to Gov. Jerry Brown,” (Tim Donnelly and Abel Maldonado, who dropped out two days later), a state senator running for Insurance Commissioner (Ted Gaines), and a public policy institute director running for Secretary of State (Pete Peterson). She also pointed out the lack of Republican candidates to challenge the weak Democrat incumbents for Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General and to run for the open seats for Controller and Treasurer.

This column inspired me to write a commentary posted on www.FlashReport.org today (January 20, 2014): “It’s Winnable! Conditions Are Ripe for a Republican to Get Elected in 2014 as California State Treasurer.” I provide five issues “for a libertarian populist-style Republican who can credibly argue to The People against crony capitalism and build a majority coalition of support from voters on the Left and Right.”

Are you such a potential candidate?

Planning for 2014: Two Recommendations in www.FlashReport.org to California Supporters of Economic Freedom and Fiscal Responsibility

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

It’s too early to predict if Californians will elect more supporters of economic freedom and fiscal responsibility to Congress, statewide office, the state legislature, and local offices in 2014. It’s also too early to know if Californians are getting sick of accumulating yet more public debt through state and local ballot measures.

In the meantime, I’m trying to promote grassroots activities that might encourage Californians to do the following:

1. Consider electing government officials with a different philosophy of government than the tax-and-spend model prevalent in much of the state.

2. Better understand and scrutinize bond measures before approving educational districts to borrow money for construction (and other expenses authorized by Proposition 39, such as iPads).

See my December 6, 2013  article California Supporters of Economic and Personal Freedom Can Plan for 2014 by Thinking Locally in www.FlashReport.com.

Three Sacramento County Superior Court Rulings on California High-Speed Rail – Bond Validation Lawsuit and Prop 1A Lawsuit – November 25, 2013

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

California High-Speed Rail Court Decisions

November 25, 2013 California High Speed Rail Authority Bond Validation Lawsuit Ruling (original source http://www.saccourt.ca.gov/general/media/docs/tos-v-ca-high-speed-rail-authority-ruling-112513.pdf)

HIGH-SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY and HIGH-SPEED PASSENGER TRAIN FINANCE COMMITTEE, for the STATE OF CALIFORNIA, Plaintiffs, v. ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE MATTER OF THE VALIDITY OF THE AUTHORIZATION AND ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS TO BE ISSUED PURSUANT TO THE SAFE, RELIABLE HIGH-SPEED PASSENGER TRAIN BOND ACT FOR
THE 21ST CENTURY AND CERTAIN PROCEEDING AND MATTER RELATED THERETO.

  • It was NOT proven to be “necessary and desirable” to authorize bond sales on 3/18/13 for California High-Speed Rail.
  • I’m referenced on pages 7-8 & page 18 (footnote 30).

August 16, 2013 Tos Fukuda Kings County v California High-Speed Rail Prop 1A Part 1 Ruling (original source http://www.saccourt.ca.gov/general/media/docs/tos-v-ca-high-speed-rail-authority-ruling.pdf)

JOHN TOS, AARON FUKUDA, COUNTY OF KINGS, Plaintiffs and Petitioners, v. CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY, et al., Defendants and Respondents.

  • California High-Speed Rail doesn’t need to rescind its Tutor-Perini contract for first segment construction (Merced to Fresno).
  • The 2012 appropriation of funds to California High-Speed Rail from Senate Bill 1029 is not invalidated.

November 25, 2013 Tos Fukuda Kings County v California High-Speed Rail Prop 1A Part 2 Ruling (original source http://www.saccourt.ca.gov/general/media/docs/tos-v-ca-high-speed-rail-authority-ruling2-112513.pdf)

JOHN TOS, AARON FUKUDA, COUNTY OF KINGS, Plaintiffs and Petitioners, v. CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY, et al., Defendants and Respondents.

  • California High-Speed Rail Authority has to rescind its approval of its non-compliant November 3, 2011 funding plan.

News Media Coverage

Judge Blocks Sale of California High-Speed Rail Bonds – Associated Press (in Sacramento Bee) – November 25, 2013

California High-Speed Rail Funding Overturned by Judge – FOX 11 (Los Angeles) – November 25, 2013

Judge Blocks Use of State Bond Money for California Bullet TrainLos Angeles Times – November 25, 2013

California High-Speed Rail Plans Stopped in TracksSan Francisco Chronicle – November 26, 2013

California’s High-Speed Rail Imperiled by Court RulingsSan Jose Mercury-News – November 25, 2013

Sacramento Judge Sides with Kings County Plaintiffs, Puts California High-Speed Rail Plan on the RopesHanford Sentinel – November 25, 2013

California High-Speed Rail Bond Sale Rejected by Judge – www.bloomberg.com – November 25, 2013

Judge Grants Partial Victory to Foes of California Bullet Train – KQED – November 25, 2013

California Bond Sale for High-Speed Rail Project Blocked by Judge – Reuters – November 26, 2013

Locals Participated in High-Speed Rail Court Case – Bakersfield Californian – November 26, 2013

Judge Blocks Sale of California High-Speed Rail Bonds – Capitol Public Radio – November 25, 2013

California High Speed Rail Bond Sales Halted and Funding Plan Invalidatedwww.nextcity.org – November 26, 2013

Judge Strikes Down High Speed Rail Bond, Causing More DelaysSilicon Valley Business Journal – November 26, 2013

Court Instructs California High-Speed Rail to Redo Funding Plan; Refuses to Validate State Bonds – www.Examiner.com – November 26, 2013

Judge Deals Setback to California High-Speed Rail ProjectWall Street Journal – November 26, 2013

Applying a Brake to High-Speed PlansThe Economist – November 26, 2013

California Judge Cuts Off State Funding for High-Speed Train Venture – FOX News Channel – November 26, 2013

Judge’s Rulings Favor Opponents of Rail Project – www.agalert.com – November 26, 2013

LaMalfa: High-Speed Rail ‘Dead in the Water’Redding Record-Searchlight – November 26, 2013

California Bullet Train Might Be Breathing Its LastMother Jones – November 25, 2013

Will High-Speed Rail Keep Rolling Ahead? – columnist Dan Walters (video) – Sacramento Bee – November 26, 2013

Hurdle for High-Speed Rail: Where is the Money? – Associated Press (in Sacramento Bee) – November 26, 2013

Hurdle For California High-Speed Rail: Where Is The Money? – KPIX Channel 5 (San Francisco), video – November 26, 2013

Judge Issues Setback to California’s High-Speed Rail Plan – KQED Forum, radio interview – November 27, 2013

  • Dan Richard, chairman, California High-Speed Rail Authority
  • Juliet Williams, political reporter for the Associated Press
  • Quentin Kopp, former chairman of California State Senate transportation committee

Bullet Train Snag Could Affect Transbay Terminal – columnists Matier & Ross (in San Francisco Chronicle) – November 27, 2013

High-Speed Rail Ruling Threatens To Derail Future Of Caltrain – KPIX Channel 5 (San Francisco), video – November 27, 2013

California State Senator Mark DeSaulnier Talks About The Fate Of High-Speed Rail – KPIX Channel 5 (San Francisco), video – December 1, 2013

Editorials

Bullet-Train Fiasco: Gov. Brown, Heed the JudgeUT San Diego – November 25, 2013

Time to End the California High-Speed Rail Fraud – Bay Area News Group (Contra Costa Times, Oakand Tribune, etc.) – November 26, 2013

Hit the Brakes on California’s High-Speed Rail FraudLos Angeles Daily News – November 26, 2013

Pump the Brakes on Bullet TrainRiverside Press-Enterprise – November 26, 2013

Judge Detours Plans for Bullet TrainOrange County Register – November 26, 2013

Bullet Train Must Deliver on Its Pledge to VotersVentura County Star – November 26, 2013

High-Speed Rail Proceeds in Fits and StartsSacramento Bee – November 27, 2013

Bumps in the Path of High-Speed RailSan Francisco Chronicle – December 1, 2013

Commentary

California Judge Sends High-Speed Rail Plan Careening Backward Into the Station – Reason Foundation – November 25, 2013

Rube Goldberg Legal System Derails California Bullet Train – The American Interest – November 26, 2013

End Game on Bullet Train: No $, No Project – and No Prospects for $ – CalWatchdog – November 26, 2013

Court Rules Against Bullet Train Authority – Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (in www.foxandhoundsdaily.com) – November 26, 2013

Obama’s Bullet Train Dream Just Derailed in California – American Enterprise Institute – November 26, 2013

Sources for Claims That One-Party Control and Government Taking More Money Triggered a California Comeback

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Prominent “Progressives” identify a simple way for governments to ease economic and social problems: take more money from people as tax revenue and spend it on programs and projects. And in 2013 they can cite an example that seems to conform with their ideas.

Yes, it’s California.

Below is a fairly comprehensive list of sources for this claim. Notice that many of these sources are based on the East Coast.

Reporters and columnists for the New York Times seem to be particularly knowledgeable about the political and economic circumstances of California. They have even personified the claim through Governor Jerry Brown, as if one heroic, enlightened man alone engineered a “comeback” for the state. (Governor Brown doesn’t do much to dispel the myth.)

I’m guessing that the interest of the New York Times in California’s economy and budget is based primarily on needing to tout an example that the federal government should emulate. The nation’s intellectual elite continues to be frustrated that the “New New Deal” that Progressives were envisioning for America after the November 2008 election never came to fruition. The “Tea Party” has exploited outdated structural checks and balances of the republican model of government and permitted the thinking of the Reagan Era to linger, hindering Progress.

California Comeback:
One-Party Control and Higher Taxes as a Model for Success
  1. California Beaming – commentary by Tim Egan – New York Times – March 28, 2013
  2. Lessons From a Comeback – column by Paul Krugman – New York Times – March 31, 2013
  3. California Faces a New Quandary, Too Much MoneyNew York Times – May 25, 2013
  4. California’s New ‘Problem’: Jerry Brown on the Sudden Surplus, and the FilibusterThe Atlantic – May 26, 2013
  5. The California Comeback: How Progressives Stopped California’s Decline – video of panel discussion at 2013 Netroots Nation – June 22, 2013
  6. California Shows the Country How to Overcome GOP Dead-EndersNew Republic – July 1, 2013
  7. California Resurgent Under Brown, But Spending a Worry – Associated Press – July 5, 2013
  8. California Economy is on the Comeback Trail. Can America Follow?Christian Science Monitor – July 23, 2013
  9. Brown Cheered in Second Act, at Least So FarNew York Times – August 16, 2013
  10. Jerry Brown’s Tough-Love California Miracle: The 75-year-old governor rescued the Golden State from financial ruin – and is reshaping a national progressive agenda – Rolling Stone – August 29, 2013
  11. New Rule: Conservatives Who Love to Brag About American Exceptionalism Must Come Here to California – commentary by Bill Maher – Huffington Post – September 27 2013
  12. Jerry Brown Calls Washington Gridlock Dangerous, ‘Really Sick’Sacramento Bee – October 2, 2013
  13. Sacramento Not as Dysfunctional as Washington, D.C. – column by Tim Rutten – Los Angeles Daily News – October 11, 2013
  14. California Sees Gridlock Ease in GoverningNew York Times – October 18, 2013
  15. Gov. Jerry Brown’s Advice for WashingtonLos Angeles Times – October 24, 2013
  16. California, Jerry Brown Enjoying Rave Reviews, but Comparisons Are TrickySacramento Bee – October 25, 2013
  17. While Congress Stalls, the Golden State Moves Forward – commentary by Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson (D) – Santa Barbara Independent – November 5, 2013
  18. California Governor Brown: A Great Power Has To Find Some Unity – NPR – November 6, 2013
  19. California, Here We Come? – column by Paul Krugman – New York Times – November 24, 2013 (praise of Covered California)

After November 23, 2013

Jerry Brown’s Revenge – commentary by Tim Egan – New York Times – March 6, 2014

Palmy Days for Jerry – commentary by Maureen Dowd – New York Times – March 22, 2014

Jerry Brown’s 4th Act – Politico – October 28, 2014

 

My Public Comments on Bond Finance for California High-Speed Rail Entered into Record for Pivotal Bond Validation Lawsuit

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

My March 15, 2013 written comments to the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee outlining several concerns about its plans for bond financing were the ONLY written comments submitted to the committee before its March 18, 2013 meeting, at which it authorized borrowing more than $8 billion for California High-Speed Rail through bond sales (a requirement under Proposition 1A).

In addition, I was one of four people to speak in person at the March 18, 2013 California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee meeting at which committee members voted to authorize the bond sales.

My written and oral comments to the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee have been entered into the record for the validation lawsuit (High Speed Rail Authority et al. v. All Persons Interested et al. – Case No. 2013-00140689) filed on March 19, 2013 in Sacramento County Superior Court concerning the legal validity of the bond sales. My comments help to boost the case of the respondents (“All Persons Interested”) that the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee failed to fulfill its legal responsibilities under Proposition 1A before it authorized the bond sales.

My written comments are submitted to the court as Exhibit G (public comment letter to the HSPT Finance Board by Kevin Dayton, March 15 , 2013) in the August 19, 2013 declaration of Rita Wespi of Californians Advocating Responsible Rail Design (CARRD) based in Palo Alto. Her declaration states that “Based on a series of Public Records Act requests I submitted to the High-Speed Rail Authority and the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee, it is my opinion that the Finance Committee voted to approve over eight billion dollars of state bonds with little more information than a resolution from the High Speed Rail Authority.”

The declaration goes on to state the following:

On March 25, 2013, I made a similar request of the HSPT Finance Committee for “copies of all reports, analyses and recommendations provided to the HSPT Finance Committee members.”

Mr. Mark Paxson, General Counsel for the Treasurer’s Office, replied that “other than the agendas, resolutions and minutes from the prior meeting that are due for approval, there are typically no other documents provided to Finance Committee members prior to their meetings.”

In his response, Mr. Paxson stated that, for the March 18 committee meeting, the HSPT Finance Committee received in total one public comment letter and a briefing memo from the Public Finance Division’s staff. The staff briefing memo simply reiterated the agenda.

The March 15, 2013 public comment letter requested the Finance Committee to add language to Resolutions IX and X which would a) prohibit 40-year terms of maturity, and b) prohibit the use of Capital Appreciation Bonds. The letter argued that without this language, the bond sales and resulting repayment schedule would deviate from what was described in the 2008 voter guide for Proposition 1A. To the best of my knowledge, this letter was not acknowledged or discussed by the Finance Committee.

The declaration is correct: the only indications that my public comment was received was a subsequent email dated March 20, 2013 from Timothy Aguirre in the State Treasurer’s office informing me that “The State Treasurer’s Office will be holding the High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee meeting on Friday, March 29, 2013 at 2:00 pm at STO Room 587. Please see the attached meeting agenda” and a March 25, 2013 email from a general mailbox for the State Treasurer’s Office stating “You have indicated you would like to be contacted on items relating to the High Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee. The resolutions to be taken up during the March 29th meeting have been posted to the State Treasurer’s website.  You can find the resolutions by following the web link provided below. http://www.treasurer.ca.gov/financial/meeting.asp.”

My comments in person at the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee meeting on March 18, 2013 were submitted as Exhibit A (transcript of the meeting) as part of an August 19, 2013 declaration of Kathy Hamilton of Menlo Park, who writes articles about California High-Speed Rail for the Examiner web site.

Kevin Dayton: Note: Tape was turned on a little late, missing his intro. Kevin is CEO of
Labor Issues Solutions.

“Will the bonds be sold separately or at the same time for state bonds for other purposes? What rate do you expect to sell them at? I heard the chairman say 6.25% but I’m going to guess that was probably made that number up out of his head. The bonds selling last week were between 3.5 and 3.8%, something like that. I’d like to hear more about what you think you will get out of this. How will the bonds be structured? Will we be selling capital appreciation bonds at all for this? If the lawsuit that is coming up in Kings County is lost by the High-Speed Rail Authority and you’ve sold bonds, what happens to the money? These are questions I think that regular Californian who voted for this want to know. [They want to know] a lot more about this. We need to know a lot more about this [because] it’s a lot of money for us especially when you consider the interest etc will be about $20 billion [interest on bond funds] total for the whole thing. Thank you.”

Carol Ferris breaks in: “I’d like to thank you for your comments. I would also like to say that the purpose of this is to hear public comment and certainly the committee members can then take your comment into consideration. It’s not a question and answer session at this time.”

As noted in Kathy Hamilton’s declaration about the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee, “There was no evidence presented, questions asked or witnesses called. There were no discussions that the approval of the High-Speed Rail resolution was necessary or desirable. There were no discussions at all…none of the appointed committee members were in attendance, and all were substitute representatives.”

In other words, it was a farce. My article California High-Speed Rail: One-Way Ticket to Debt in www.FlashReport.org on March 25, 2013 described my experience speaking at the March 18, 2013 meetings of the California High-Speed Rail Authority and the California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee. Also related to this meeting are my March 15, 2013 post Message to California High-Speed Rail Authority and California High-Speed Passenger Train Finance Committee: No 40-Year Bonds, No Capital Appreciation Bonds, What If You Lose Lawsuit? and my March 30, 2013 post Reality of Crushing Public Debt from Bond Sales Eclipses the Fantasy Vision of California High-Speed Rail.

Additional Background on Bond Validation Lawsuits

Documents filed in California High-Speed Rail Bond Validation Lawsuit – on the web site of Transportation Solutions Defense and Education Fund (TRANSDEF)

Sacramento Judge Has a Full Plate of Rail LawsuitsFresno Bee – September 9, 2013

Legal Challenges Plague the California Rail Projectwww.Examiner.com, by Kathy Hamilton – September 8, 2013

Bullet Project Attempts Legal Maneuver to Limit Damage by Lawsuits – www.Examiner.com, by Kathy Hamilton – April 2, 2013

California’s High-Speed Rail Authority Sues Everybody, Invites You to Argue Case in CourtSan Jose Mercury-News – March 28, 2013

California High-Speed Rail’s Approval Rating Should Be 30% – My Article in www.FlashReport.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

In an April 12, 2013 post in www.FlashReport.org, I ask this question:

Why does a significant minority of Californians STILL support California High-Speed Rail after all of its financial and management fiascoes?

I conclude that some Californians are unaware of what’s happening with this project. I encourage readers to provide the uninformed citizen with ten reasons not to support it. See the reasons at California High-Speed Rail’s Approval Rating Should Be 30%.

For more detailed information about California High-Speed Rail, see www.CaliforniaHighSpeedRailScam.com and follow @CaHSR_scam on Twitter.